Holistic Healing Honey

By Toni Lewis

Honey is the world’s most complete food.

It's holistic!

This liquid gold has amazing healing properties, both curative and preventive.

I'm talking about "raw" honey, baby!

It is anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal and can be used without fear of side effects. A holistic alternative to harsh medications, raw honey is easy to digest and it’s delicious.  And compared to sugar it is the winner hands down. 

I used to suffer from acid-reflux.  After being diagnosed and having to revisit the doctor for treatment more than once, it seemed there was nothing to do but submit to taking a pill every day for the rest of my life.  But, that thought didn’t fit my lifestyle so I did what I always do concerning my health.  I looked for an alternative remedy.  

My search led me to Manuka honey.

The Manuka tree only grows in New Zealand and blooms just six weeks of the year (which explains the price).  This raw honey naturally contains nutrients that are vital to healthy bodies like;

  • Ascorbic Acid (vitamin C)
  • Pantothenic acid
  • Pyridosine
  • Biotin
  • Thiamine
  • Riboflavin
  • Niacin
  • Rutin
  • 21 amino acids
  • 11 enzymes
  • 14 minerals.  

For dressing wounds Manuka honey has had a significant standing since ancient times.

It is composed mainly of glucose and fructose(two sugars that strongly attract water).

The honey absorbs the water in the wound, drying it out so that bacteria and fungi are inhibited. 

Ok, here is the confusing part of buying Manuka honey.

 All Manuka honey jars will most likely display the word “Active” on the label. 

The Waikato Honey Research Unit at Ohio State University states,  “Confusingly there is now honey being sold as ”Active Manuka Honey” where the seller is referring to antibacterial activity that is due to hydrogen peroxide just like in all other types of honey, and not to the non-peroxide type of antibacterial activity that is unique to Manuka honey.” 

So, this would indicate that "active" Manuka honey with its non-peroxide, anti-bacterial activity, is more effective than honey with hydrogen peroxide against some types of bacteria. 

The honey's jar will also display some sort of certification.  One of the most popular is UMF (Unique Manuka Factor), which guarantees a non-peroxide activity and is vigorously tested in Labs approved by the AMHA (Active Manuka Honey Assoc.) in New Zealand.

Internally, “active” Manuka honey is taken for:

  • Acid reflux
  • Heartburn
  • Esophagus ulcers
  • Esophagitis
  • Up-set stomach
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Pylori gastritis duodenal ulcer,
  • Ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Consumed daily, honey can raise the blood levels of antioxidant compounds in our bodies.

When honey is extensively processed and heated, the benefits of phyto-nutrients are largely eliminated. So your commercially processed honey has little to no curative properties. That said there are a lot of honeys on the market that are great just for their naturally delicious flavor.  


It's a big deal holistically, honey

The raw organic honey that I’ve been using for the last two years has been Wedderspoon Organic Active Manuka Honey.  It fits my holistic lifestyle.  I take a half-teaspoon before my biggest meals and I very rarely have a bout of acid reflux.  If I happen to have a particularly spicy meal or happen to eat too close to bedtime, I’ll take a small amount and let it dissolve under my tongue.  

Using raw Manuka honey has given me a peace of mind.

I have one more holistic tool in my toolbox and I don't have to burden my liver with that purple pill every day.  Every time I find a healthy alternative to prescription drugs, I feel that much more in sync with my philosophy of the mind, body, and spirit connection.  

I hope this saves you some legwork and takes some of the mystery out of medicinal honey.  

In the United States, feeding honey to children under the age of one year is not recommended.  It could be toxic.  Please be honey-wise. 

Walk in Beauty.




















Follow HBeautyCompass on Twitter